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Tune in tomorrow to watch part 11 of The World Turned Upside Down, Alan Woods' video series on the English Revolution! By leaving London, King Charles had set in motion a chain of events that would lead inevitably to civil war...

King Charles' patience with his rebellious parliament ran out, and he launched an attempted coup d'état, leading to one of the most famous scenes in English history, with Charles arriving at parliament with a list of names for arrest, only to find "the birds [had] flown" – and leaving empty handed to defiant calls of "privilege!" The city of London was soon in a state of revolutionary insurrection. A fight within the privileged classes had spilled out onto the streets. The masses were in control of the capital. The Civil War had begun.

If King Charles thought Strafford's execution would calm the situation in England, he was dead wrong. Aside from continued opposition from Pym and parliament, the masses were becoming bolder, arming themselves, acquiring revolutionary force, and even starting to worry the more-moderate parliamentarians.

We publish the following interview with Alan Woods (editor of marxist.com), conducted by the Exit Theatre Group in Iran. Over the course of a long discussion, Alan talks about the role of culture and the arts in society, politics and revolution.

Interview with Erika Roedl, an International Marxist Tendency activist in Minneapolis and writer for Socialist Revolution, where she explains the movement against the racist police murder of George Floyd, the role of the Democrats, the emergence of neighbourhood committees and the perspectives for the movement.

The cold-blooded murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police is yet another horrific act of racist violence against an unarmed black man in broad daylight. This has yet again sparked protests across the country, showing that people are fed up with the systemic racism of the capitalist system. When the great revolutionary martyr Malcolm X said, “You can’t have capitalism without racism,” he summed up a profound truth about the world we live in. This racist brutality is hardwired into the capitalist system. This Saturday at 7PM ET, Antonio Balmer (Socialist Revolution editor) will speak on racism, police violence, and the need for revolution.

Charles I was determined to enforce his authority in matters of religion and state. His reforms to the church provoked horror and resentment from the people of England, and he exploited loopholes to raise cash through taxes, particularly the hated ship money. Terrible punishment was meted out against anyone who objected. But at the peak of his power, Charles was about to face a fall.

Tune in tomorrow for episode six of Alan Woods' video series on the English Revolution! With parliament suspended, Charles I was determined to enforce his authority in matters of religion and state. His reforms to the church provoked horror and resentment from the people of England, and he exploited loopholes to raise cash through taxes, particularly the hated ship money. Terrible punishment was meted out against anyone who objected. But at the peak of his power, Charles was about to face a fall.

In this episode, Alan describes the escalating conflicts between King Charles and parliament. Charles dissolved parliament several times, culminating in a dissolution that was to last for 11 years. The country was now firmly on the road to war and revolution.

Watch the fourth episode our podcast series, The English Revolution: the world turned upside down. Alan Woods discusses the escalating conflicts between parliament and the machiavellian King Charles, who wanted money to fund various military adventures. These splits at the top were concurrent with a seething discontent at the bottom of society, reflected in the murder of the King’s favourite, the Duke of Buckingham. The outlines of eventual civil war were taking shape.