Part 3

The Farsi original of this article was published on www.kargar.org in July 2002 and in Kargar-e Socialist No. 114 in August 2002. Part four remains to be published.

See Part One - Two - Four

The perspectives for the workers' movement

Creating a modern capitalist state tied to the policies of the international banks and the world capitalist system means that foreign capital, and also the dollars of exiled Iranian capitalists, will have to flow into Iran. Foreign capitalists, who have for years been anticipating large investments in Iran's industries and, because of the lack of any guarantees by the regime for the security of their capital, have concentrated their capital outside Iran's borders, will in the next period enter Iran's undeveloped economic scene by importing spare parts, training technicians and technocrats, professional managers and so on. All along, one of the complaints of the “reformers” has been the shortage of professional managers in the factories. For example, in a recent interview with Radio Azadi, Massood Behnood complained about the non-professionalism of managers and gives this as one of the reasons for the failure of reforms.

  Part 2

The Farsi original of this article was published on www.kargar.org in July 2002 and in Kargar-e Socialist No. 114 in August 2002.  The remaining parts will be published in the next few weeks.

  See Part One - Three - Four

 

 

The Iranian regime's position in response to the EU's turn

 

A day after the EU foreign ministers' Luxembourg decision [at the meeting of the heads of 15 European Union countries in Luxembourg on 17 June 2002, where the EU took steps to consolidating its relations with the Iranian regime, Editor’s note] all the media welcomed this step. Hamid-Reza Asefi, the Foreign Ministry spokesman, and Mohammad-Javad Zarif, the Deputy Foreign Minister, expressed their satisfaction with the decision. This event alone reveals the reduction of internal differences within the regime over the new orientation towards world capitalism.

 

Part 1

 

The Farsi original of this article was published on www.kargar.org in July 2002 and in Kargar-e Socialist No. 114 in August 2002. The remaining parts will be published over the next few weeks.

 

 

See Part Two - Three - Four

The meeting of the heads of 15 European Union countries in Luxembourg on 17 June 2002, which followed on from the recent position of European governments that emerged in a similar meeting a month earlier, has strengthened relations with Iran. Next September the Council of Ministers will begin discussions with Iran for the signing of an economic co-operation treaty (of course, depending on the European parliament ratifying it, which it probably will).

As these lines are being written hundreds of thousands of Iranians have poured onto the streets to celebrate the victory of Hassan Rouhani, in the presidential elections. Pictures of mass celebrations all over Iran are circulating the internet. This is an open defiance of Khamenei and the whole security apparatus of the regime which was dealt a humiliating defeat in the elections.

Yet again the Iranian presidential elections have taken an unforeseen turn. After excluding all his critics and most obvious competitors from the race, Khamenei had thought that he could secure a peaceful campaign period concluding with his handpicked candidate on top. But contrary to his calculations his recent actions have opened up even deeper rifts in the ruling clique. His feeble attempt at forcing unity within the regime has resulted in his faction coming out as the weakest one in the race. At the same time the campaign of Hassan Rouhani has seen a sudden surge in popularity with hundreds of thousands of discontented youth at its mass meetings and rallies.

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