History & Theory

This section deals with the major aspects of Marxist theory: dialectical materialism, historical materialism, Marxist economics, the class nature of the USSR, the colonial revolution, and more.

Recent highlights:

WWI – Part Twelve: Under Fire – the real face of War

Written by Alan Woods Friday, 27 November 2015

barbusse henryUnder Fire: The Story of a Squad (French: Le Feu: journal d'une escouade) by Henri Barbusse was written in December 1916. It was one of the first novels about the First World War to be published and was based on Barbusse's personal experiences as a soldier in the French Army on the Western Front. Le Feu made an immediate impact, winning the prestigious Prix Goncourt the same year it was published. It remains one of the great novels about the "war to end all wars”.


Engels was right!

Written by Margherita Colella Wednesday, 04 November 2015

human-from-apeThree recent scientific papers have reignited the debate on a subject that was always a matter of contention between science and religion: the development of humankind from prehistory to now. In the last twenty years, advances in science have confirmed the need to study all fields of knowledge, from biology to cosmology, with a dialectical approach. This approach enables us to interpret the world as it is in constant motion and contradiction, in permanent transformation, and teaches us how to study processes as mutually connected. This takes into account the fascinating complexity that all of this implies.


Horror Film—The Decline of Capitalism Through the Lens

Written by Mark Rahman Monday, 02 November 2015

psychoshowerIn an article on World War I, Lenin once remarked that, “Capitalist society is and has always been horror without end.” In discussing the early development of capitalism in his classic, Capital, Marx said that upon its arrival in history “capital comes dripping from head to foot, from every pore, with blood and dirt.” In the same book, Marx stated that, “Capital is dead labor, that, vampire-like, only lives by sucking living labor, and lives the more, the more labor it sucks.” In the very same chapter, Marx compares the capitalists’ drive for surplus labor to a “werewolf’s hunger.”


Reading guide: Marxist philosophy

Written by In Defence of Marxism Friday, 30 October 2015

marx-engels“It is, therefore, from the history of nature and human society that the laws of dialectics are abstracted. For they are nothing but the most general laws of these two aspects of historical development, as well as of thought itself.” (Engels)


Page 1 of 75