History & Theory

This section deals with the major aspects of Marxist theory: dialectical materialism, historical materialism, Marxist economics, the class nature of the USSR, the colonial revolution, and more.

Recent highlights:

WWI – Part Nine: The USA and the War: War is good for business

Written by Alan Woods Friday, 17 April 2015
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US soldiers wwi-thSomebody once said to Lenin war is terrible, to which he replied: “yes, terribly profitable”. The European war suited the American industrialists rather well. Capitalism in the USA had developed with whirlwind speed in the last decades of the 19th century. At the beginning of the War in Europe America was already a powerful young nation with a mighty industrial base. In this war it played the role of chief usurer and quartermaster to the European belligerents.

 

What will socialism look like?

Written by Ben Gliniecki Tuesday, 14 April 2015
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dead-end-thToday, we find ourselves in the midst of one of the deepest crises capitalism has ever faced. While the 99% are being asked to pay for the crisis, the 1% are amassing wealth at an ever accelerating pace. The saturating level of scandal and corruption in the establishment is alienating millions from traditional politics. All of this is causing a deep questioning of capitalist society. Many are looking for an alternative to the system that we have, and a growing number are looking towards revolutionary socialism for the answer.

 

Marxism and the national question in Scotland

Written by Alan Woods Friday, 10 April 2015
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Marxism and the national question in ScotlandWe have entered into a new period on an international scale: a period of deep economic crisis, social and political instability. The masses everywhere are beginning to question things that were previously taken for granted. The whole political scene is a seething cauldron. In such a period sharp and sudden changes are implicit in the situation. The Scottish referendum was just such a sudden change, a political earthquake that upset all the calculations of the politicians. It represented a fundamental turn in the situation.

 

WWI – Part Eight: Victims and aggressors

Written by Alan Woods Friday, 27 March 2015
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Serbian retreat WWIWhile the armies of the Great Powers were busy slaughtering each other in Flanders, Tannenberg and Gallipoli, their weaker brethren were watching with keen anticipation from the sidelines like vultures waiting to gorge themselves on the corpses of the defeated party. As long as it remained unclear which of the big bandits would prove the stronger, the little bandits had to be patient and wait for their opportunity to arrive.

 

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